stef. 25. sexual, romantic, masochistic.
This blog is often 18+ and sometimes NSFW. Have fun.
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ungyo:

(x)

Saw the video floating around so I gif’d it for anyone who doesn’t wanna actually watch it haha.

(Source: flybaldies, via friendlycloud)

47,905 notes

(Source: notyourblonde, via johnwastaken)

126,557 notes

baretobush:

The Reality of Nude Photos
Alright, so this is a little bit of an unrelated note to my regular posts, but I feel like it’s important. I want to take just a quick minute to explain the difference I see between a naked body that’s posed and a naked body that is just that: a naked body.
When we look at naked people on the internet (be it Porn Stars, “selfies” taken by internet-famous bloggers, or professional freelance models), they are almost always in these poses that elongate the body, stretch out the muscles, show off the ribs, push the breasts forward and hide all of those squishy rolls that happen when we relax. I am not attacking them, so please don’t feel defensive if those are the kinds of photos you are a part of. They’re beautiful, I have no problem with them. I just feel called to point out that a body that looks so “sexy” or “slender” or “desirable” in one picture, can look squishy, vulnerable and saggy in the next just by letting go of a pose. No one wants to post those pictures, those are the ones you delete before they’re even out of the camera. No one wants to say, “Hey! Here’s a selfie of how my tummy puffs out and look, can you see the stretch marks on my breasts!?”
I took both of those pictures this morning, minutes apart. They’re both me. They’re both completely unedited. They are simply meant to show the difference between a body that is carefully designed to be sexy and well-received, and a body that is just sitting there being a naked body on a bed in the morning.
I’m not saying that people shouldn’t pose in photos, or that photos designed to look sexy are bad whatsoever, so please don’t think that’s what I’m getting at. I just felt like sharing a picture of what a body really looks like sitting on a bed, instead of an image of what a body looks like carefully posed on a bed.

baretobush:

The Reality of Nude Photos

Alright, so this is a little bit of an unrelated note to my regular posts, but I feel like it’s important. I want to take just a quick minute to explain the difference I see between a naked body that’s posed and a naked body that is just that: a naked body.

When we look at naked people on the internet (be it Porn Stars, “selfies” taken by internet-famous bloggers, or professional freelance models), they are almost always in these poses that elongate the body, stretch out the muscles, show off the ribs, push the breasts forward and hide all of those squishy rolls that happen when we relax. I am not attacking them, so please don’t feel defensive if those are the kinds of photos you are a part of. They’re beautiful, I have no problem with them. I just feel called to point out that a body that looks so “sexy” or “slender” or “desirable” in one picture, can look squishy, vulnerable and saggy in the next just by letting go of a pose. No one wants to post those pictures, those are the ones you delete before they’re even out of the camera. No one wants to say, “Hey! Here’s a selfie of how my tummy puffs out and look, can you see the stretch marks on my breasts!?”

I took both of those pictures this morning, minutes apart. They’re both me. They’re both completely unedited. They are simply meant to show the difference between a body that is carefully designed to be sexy and well-received, and a body that is just sitting there being a naked body on a bed in the morning.

I’m not saying that people shouldn’t pose in photos, or that photos designed to look sexy are bad whatsoever, so please don’t think that’s what I’m getting at. I just felt like sharing a picture of what a body really looks like sitting on a bed, instead of an image of what a body looks like carefully posed on a bed.

(via submissivefeminist)

136,548 notes

glitterglobe:

important things to remember

  • if someone doesn’t reply to your message they are probably busy, not ignoring you
  • just because someone doesn’t message you first, it doesn’t mean they don’t care about you
  • if someone seems upset or distant they probably aren’t upset at you in particular
  • lots of people love you and you’re not annoying

(Source: waluigiware, via pandapanda-munchmunch)

85,847 notes

theroguefeminist:

elliedoh:

So when Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry bring black girls on stage, dance with them, acknowledge their figures- it’s offensive and appropriating. But, when Nicki Minaj makes an entire video focusing around black girl’s asses and asserts her power, reduces these women to objects and flaunts her authority it’s YAAASSSSS NICKI SERVE IT. Is that because she’s black? So it’s okay for people of the same race to dance with each other but someone who does not share the same levels of melanin enters the picture, they’re doing something wrong? …idgi 

You’re completely ignoring context. In Lily Allen’s Hard out Here video, she literally says, “I don’t shake my ass cause I have a brain” as Black women shake their asses in her video. She is literally degrading the Black women who shake their asses in the media. The song also uses references to Black rappers (i.e. the title of the song referencing the rap song “Hard out Here for a Pimp” and her lyric “bragging ‘bout my cars or talking ‘bout my chains”), suggesting that Black rappers are more sexist than white male musicians (which isn’t true, there’s lots of sexism in all music genres) and also suggest the source of sexism in the music industry is Black people (Black male rappers and twerking Black female dancers).
In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.
In what way is Nicki asserting power over her dancers? In her video, she twerks along side her back up dancers and dances with them and interacts with them on the same level. She is just as scantily clad as they are. Lily Allen, however, stays fully covered in her video, does not dance provocatively, and thus contrasts her own pure and respectable femininity with the Black women, using their twerking and scantily clad bodies as an example of “bad” female sexuality and femininity—of women “objectifying themselves.” This is racist because it frames Black female sexuality as lesser than white femininity and antithetical to feminism.
In summary: Nicki’s video is very much a celebration of female Black beauty and sexuality coming from a Black woman. Conversely, Lilly Allen’s is using Black women as props to frame them as a vile or bad form of sexuality or being too sexual to prop up her own feminism.
So you might say, “what about Miley Cyrus? she twerks along side her Black background dancers too!” But here’s the problem: Miley Cyrus continually appropriates Black culture and also uses Black women as props. It does matter that these artists are white because in these cases the point of including the Black women is either to, in Lily Allen’s case, offset Black sexuality/femininity as too sexual or bad in comparison with her white femininity/feminism, or, in the case of Miley Cyrus, to get “street cred” and exotify her own sexuality by appropriating Black culture and using Black people as props to do so. See this analysis of Lily Allen’s Hard Out Here video and this analysis of Miley Cyrus by Black people who know a lot more about this than I do.
I haven’t seen anything about Katy Perry using Black dancers. I’ve just seen criticisms of her appropriating AAVE and other PoC cultures. I’m not sure why you brought her up, but maybe I just haven’t seen the videos in question.
Either way, it’s not like white artists having a diverse cast of back up dancers is a bad thing automatically. Here is an example of a white artist using back up dancers of other races without objectifying them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ilh1ewceco (notice this artist tackles the same issue as Lily Allen—sexism/objectification in the media—without being misogynist and racist toward other women). But the examples of Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus ARE racist and Nicki Minaj’s video isn’t the same as theirs.

theroguefeminist:

elliedoh:

So when Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry bring black girls on stage, dance with them, acknowledge their figures- it’s offensive and appropriating. But, when Nicki Minaj makes an entire video focusing around black girl’s asses and asserts her power, reduces these women to objects and flaunts her authority it’s YAAASSSSS NICKI SERVE IT. Is that because she’s black? So it’s okay for people of the same race to dance with each other but someone who does not share the same levels of melanin enters the picture, they’re doing something wrong? …idgi 

You’re completely ignoring context. In Lily Allen’s Hard out Here video, she literally says, “I don’t shake my ass cause I have a brain” as Black women shake their asses in her video. She is literally degrading the Black women who shake their asses in the media. The song also uses references to Black rappers (i.e. the title of the song referencing the rap song “Hard out Here for a Pimp” and her lyric “bragging ‘bout my cars or talking ‘bout my chains”), suggesting that Black rappers are more sexist than white male musicians (which isn’t true, there’s lots of sexism in all music genres) and also suggest the source of sexism in the music industry is Black people (Black male rappers and twerking Black female dancers).

In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.

In what way is Nicki asserting power over her dancers? In her video, she twerks along side her back up dancers and dances with them and interacts with them on the same level. She is just as scantily clad as they are. Lily Allen, however, stays fully covered in her video, does not dance provocatively, and thus contrasts her own pure and respectable femininity with the Black women, using their twerking and scantily clad bodies as an example of “bad” female sexuality and femininity—of women “objectifying themselves.” This is racist because it frames Black female sexuality as lesser than white femininity and antithetical to feminism.

In summary: Nicki’s video is very much a celebration of female Black beauty and sexuality coming from a Black woman. Conversely, Lilly Allen’s is using Black women as props to frame them as a vile or bad form of sexuality or being too sexual to prop up her own feminism.

So you might say, “what about Miley Cyrus? she twerks along side her Black background dancers too!” But here’s the problem: Miley Cyrus continually appropriates Black culture and also uses Black women as props. It does matter that these artists are white because in these cases the point of including the Black women is either to, in Lily Allen’s case, offset Black sexuality/femininity as too sexual or bad in comparison with her white femininity/feminism, or, in the case of Miley Cyrus, to get “street cred” and exotify her own sexuality by appropriating Black culture and using Black people as props to do so. See this analysis of Lily Allen’s Hard Out Here video and this analysis of Miley Cyrus by Black people who know a lot more about this than I do.

I haven’t seen anything about Katy Perry using Black dancers. I’ve just seen criticisms of her appropriating AAVE and other PoC cultures. I’m not sure why you brought her up, but maybe I just haven’t seen the videos in question.

Either way, it’s not like white artists having a diverse cast of back up dancers is a bad thing automatically. Here is an example of a white artist using back up dancers of other races without objectifying them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ilh1ewceco (notice this artist tackles the same issue as Lily Allen—sexism/objectification in the media—without being misogynist and racist toward other women). But the examples of Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus ARE racist and Nicki Minaj’s video isn’t the same as theirs.

(via titotito)

55,171 notes

sickomobb:

ghivashels:

colinmorgasms:

what if obama does the ice bucket challenge and nominates queen elizabeth

what if obama actually talks about what’s going on in ferguson

what if obama stopped exterminating the middle eastern population with drones

(via l0ngbottomleaf)

193,176 notes

shogunofyellow:

nature is rad

(via thehershburglar)

96,030 notes

jtotheizzoe:

smartereveryday:

Have you ever been stung by a jellyfish? Want to know what was actually happening? First ever footage (that I’ve seen) of an actual jellyfish sting in microscopic slow motion. Check it out! 

This makes at least two times that Destin has captured something that no one has ever seen before via YouTube (here’s the other). We live in amazing times, eh?

Next time you look at a jelly, venomous or otherwise, I hope you carry a bit of awe with you. Remember, even the most basic creatures are products of hundreds of millions of years of intricate natural selection and evolution, and their simplicity should not take away from their wonder.

1,083 notes

selfcareafterrape:

The Basics:
Common Responses to Rape/Sexual Assault(ppt)
Talking About Trauma (ppt)
Talking About Trauma (to others)
Traumaversaries
Why You Aren’t Bad for Loving Your Abuser.
What is Rape?
Need Help With:
Sleep
Nightmares
Surviving the Holidays (ppt)
Overstimulated Nerves
Self-Injury (ppt)
Flashbacks (ppt)
Dissociating (ppt)
Making Peace With the Emotion Monster
Disordered Eating, What it is and What you can do about it.
Admitting Weakness
Suicidal Ideation
Triggers:
I’m triggered- Now What?
More On Triggers
On Purposely Triggering Yourself
Boundaries:
Boundaries (ppt)
Boundaries 101
Boundaries: How to set them
Self-Care:
What is Self Care Anyway?
BACE Method
Self Care When You Lack a Sense of Self
Interpersonal Self-Care
Emotional Self Care
Physical Self Care
How to Do Self Care When You Only Have A Little Bit of Time
Consent/sex:
Intimacy After Rape
Lets Talk Consent
Lets Talk Sex
Sexuality After Rape
For Friends/Family/Partners of Survivors:
How to Help a Friend Who Has Been Raped.(ppt)
Avoiding Awkward- How to talk about rape when we talk to survivors.(ppt)
Sometimes the easiest thing to say is the worst.
A Friend is Self Harming (ppt)
Comfort In. Complain Out.
What Can I Do?
A Friend is Dissociating.(ppt)
Reality Checks

selfcareafterrape:

The Basics:

Common Responses to Rape/Sexual Assault(ppt)

Talking About Trauma (ppt)

Talking About Trauma (to others)

Traumaversaries

Why You Aren’t Bad for Loving Your Abuser.

What is Rape?

Need Help With:

Sleep

Nightmares

Surviving the Holidays (ppt)

Overstimulated Nerves

Self-Injury (ppt)

Flashbacks (ppt)

Dissociating (ppt)

Making Peace With the Emotion Monster

Disordered Eating, What it is and What you can do about it.

Admitting Weakness

Suicidal Ideation

Triggers:

I’m triggered- Now What?

More On Triggers

On Purposely Triggering Yourself

Boundaries:

Boundaries (ppt)

Boundaries 101

Boundaries: How to set them

Self-Care:

What is Self Care Anyway?

BACE Method

Self Care When You Lack a Sense of Self

Interpersonal Self-Care

Emotional Self Care

Physical Self Care

How to Do Self Care When You Only Have A Little Bit of Time

Consent/sex:

Intimacy After Rape

Lets Talk Consent

Lets Talk Sex

Sexuality After Rape

For Friends/Family/Partners of Survivors:

How to Help a Friend Who Has Been Raped.(ppt)

Avoiding Awkward- How to talk about rape when we talk to survivors.(ppt)

Sometimes the easiest thing to say is the worst.

A Friend is Self Harming (ppt)

Comfort In. Complain Out.

What Can I Do?

A Friend is Dissociating.(ppt)

Reality Checks

(via warcrimenancydrew)

35,197 notes

(Source: fumarico, via baptisms)

2,439 notes